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Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPP) are authorized and defined by Title 1 of the Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA) passed by Congress on November 21, 2003, and signed into law by President Bush on December 3, 2003.The Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA) places renewed emphasis on community planning by extending a variety of benefits to communities with wildfire protection plans in place. HFRA recognizes community plans and priorities have an important role in shaping management on federal and non-federal lands.

The Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA) places renewed emphasis on community planning by extending a variety of benefits to communities with wildfire protection plans in place. HFRA recognizes community plans and priorities have an important role in shaping management on federal and non-federal lands.

The Mission of the Pennsylvania Firewise Community Advisory Committee is to promote fire safety in the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) environment within the Commonwealth through prevention mitigation endeavors. The Advisory Committee shall use as its blueprint, Pennsylvania Firewise Community Program Model documents, in concert with the National Firewise Community/USA program, to foster development, planning, and mitigation strategies for the best defense at reducing wildfire threats in our state, woodlands, and residential developments.

The Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry has conducted an independent wildfire hazard risk assessment for the various municipalities across Warren County. Wildfire hazard is defined based on conditions that affect wildfire ignition and/or behavior such as fuel, topography, and local weather. As defined by the National Park Service fire hazard (or potential) is the difficulty of controlling potential wildfire. It is commonly determined by fire behavior characteristics such as rate-of-spread, intensity, torching, crowning, spotting, and fire persistence, and by resistance-to-control. It may be partitioned into particular components such as crown-fire hazard. Carey and Schumann (2003) document that fire hazard reduction is a continual process that cannot be accomplished by a single prescribed fire, or by analogy, thinning treatment (Brown et al., 2003). Crown fire hazard is a physical situation (fuels, weather, and topography) with potential for causing harm or damage as a result of crown fire (Scott and Reinhardt, 2001). Based on this assessment, the majority of municipalities within Warren County have a high wildfire hazard potential (Warren City, Brokenstraw Township (TWP), Cherry Grove TWP, Conewango TWP, Deerfield TWP, Eldred TWP, Elk TWP, Glade TWP, Limestone TWP, Mead TWP, Pine Grove TWP, Pittsfield TWP, Pleasant TWP, Sheffield TWP, Southwest TWP, Triumph TWP, and Watson TWP). Columbus, Farmington, Freehold and Spring Creek Townships along with Sugar Grove Borough are considered to have medium wildfire hazard potential. Data was not available for Bear Lake, Clarendon, Tidioute, and Youngsville Boroughs, or Sugar Grove Township in the Warren County 2010 Hazard Mitigation Plan.

Warren and Forest County solicited an independent contractor to prepare a county wide community fire protection plan for each county. An initial meeting on June 27, 2012 was held to bring the stakeholders together and begin the planning process. The core team consisted of Dan Glotz- Planning Warren County, Doug Carlson – Planning Forest County, Donna Zofcin – Planning Forest County, Cecile Stetler – Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and Peter To – Allegheny National Forest. Wildland Fire Associates was hired to conduct the planning process and generate the plans.
Several homeowners in the planning area are actively practicing the fire mitigation measures recommended by FireWise, a tool designed to protect homes and other property from the impacts of a wildfire. However, other homeowners have taken little or no action to protect their properties from wildland fire. The inconsistent application of FireWise mitigation measures may place their neighbors at increased risk from wildfire.